Studio

Machine Books is a digital and print publishing consultancy working with cutting edge technology but with traditional editorial values. We collaborate with all manner of enterprises to help them realise their full publishing potential.

CONDÉ NAST BRITAIN

Digital product development for new and existing platforms
Vogue | GQ | WIRED | GLAMOUR | CN Traveller

WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION

Concept, build and publish of digital reports

THE CANADIAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE

Development and delivery of digital essay series

Books

Machine Books is a progressive publishing house working in the fields of design and technology. We commission and distribute the work of writers engaged with explaining why the world looks as it does.

Year Zero

Style: In defence of…

Other books

World / Building

Style: In Defence Of...

George Lukacs described the style of a piece of work as the attempt to reproduce ones view of the world within it. This series is about the content and context of style.

THE BAROQUE

Owen Hopkins

BRUTALISM

Dr Barnabas Calder

EXPRESSIONISM

Darran Anderson

GOTHIC

Jonathan Glancey

CHINESE ARCHITECTURE

Sylvia Chan

CONSTRUCTIVISM

Theodoros Dounas

PARAMETRICISM

Patrik Schumacher

ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE

Karl Sharro

ARTS AND CRAFTS

Annie Warburton

MODERNISM

Austin Williams

CLASSICISM

Robert Adam

NO STYLE

Amin Taha

POST-MODERNISM

Adam Nathaniel Furman

HIGH TECH

Tim Abrahams

METABOLISM

Penny Lewis

Drawing Matter

Live Projects

Peter Smithson

Obelisk, 2002

Greatest Buildings of the 21st Century

A monthly series of essays exploring the best in contemporary architecture and the way in which critics judge it.

The Additional Dimensions

by Austin Williams

Permission to Live

by Stephen Phelan

The Idea of the Obelisk

by Tim Abrahams

Archaeologies of the Modern Olympics

This series and book tells the history of the modern Olympics through the things it designs and makes: from its mascots to its stadia.

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Titled The Journey That Changed Everything, the cinematic ad marks what would have been Benz’s 170th birthday by chronicling her test drive of her husband Carl’s invention in 1888.

Benz embarked on the almost 100km journey in the vehicle with her two sons, Eugen and Richard, in part to draw the attention of the public, which at the time was still deeply suspicious of the new ‘horseless carriages’. As the ad chronicles, as a woman driver, Benz also drew plenty of attention herself.

Released to coincide with International Women’s Day, the ad is as much an examination of a powerful woman from the past as a story of the evolution of Mercedes-Benz. The spot makes much of Benz’s femininity, showing her forced to enter a male-only bar to get the required fuel for the car, and also using her hatpin and garter as tools to help get the vehicle started.

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We’re now familiar with the female empowerment genre of advertising, and the ‘inspirational’ element of this spot feels a touch heavy handed at times, but what sets it apart is the sector it sits in. Car advertising is still enormously male dominated – both in those cast in the ads and in the intended audience – so it feels refreshing to see an ad from a car brand that celebrates women. Considering that women are now buying more cars than men, this is an approach that is long overdue.

Credits:
Agency: antoni_garage
ECD: Marcell Francke, Tilman Gossner, Veit Moeller
Creative Director: Alice Bottaro
Creative Director Digital: Juliane Krause-Akelbein
Production Company: Anorak Film
Director: Sebastian Strasser

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Titled The Journey That Changed Everything, the cinematic ad marks what would have been Benz’s 170th birthday by chronicling her test drive of her husband Carl’s invention in 1888.

Benz embarked on the almost 100km journey in the vehicle with her two sons, Eugen and Richard, in part to draw the attention of the public, which at the time was still deeply suspicious of the new ‘horseless carriages’. As the ad chronicles, as a woman driver, Benz also drew plenty of attention herself.

Released to coincide with International Women’s Day, the ad is as much an examination of a powerful woman from the past as a story of the evolution of Mercedes-Benz. The spot makes much of Benz’s femininity, showing her forced to enter a male-only bar to get the required fuel for the car, and also using her hatpin and garter as tools to help get the vehicle started.

Caption test

We’re now familiar with the female empowerment genre of advertising, and the ‘inspirational’ element of this spot feels a touch heavy handed at times, but what sets it apart is the sector it sits in. Car advertising is still enormously male dominated – both in those cast in the ads and in the intended audience – so it feels refreshing to see an ad from a car brand that celebrates women. Considering that women are now buying more cars than men, this is an approach that is long overdue.

Credits:
Agency: antoni_garage
ECD: Marcell Francke, Tilman Gossner, Veit Moeller
Creative Director: Alice Bottaro
Creative Director Digital: Juliane Krause-Akelbein
Production Company: Anorak Film
Director: Sebastian Strasser

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An Archaeology of the Modern Olympics

Introduction to a series of essays that considers the artefacts produced by the modern Olympic movement as artefacts worthy of analysis on their own terms.